Independent Women's Forum RSS feedhttp://www.iwf.orgThe RSS feed for the IWF. News, Commentary and Blog posts from the Independent Women's Foundation.(...)IWF RSShttp://iwf.org/images/email-logo.pnghttp://www.iwf.org33968The Unsung Virtues of the Old-Fashioned Family Photo Album<p> I have roughly 10,000 photos sitting on my iPhone. I&rsquo;ve never downloaded them because my computer doesn&rsquo;t have enough memory to hold all the photos. Last year, I downloaded around 7,000 photos to a separate memory drive. It sits in a drawer. The pictures are never seen.</p> <p> Sometimes I scroll through the most recent photos still sitting on my phone but my kids only see them if they happen to be sitting with me, and those photos only cover the last 6-months or so of activities. As for pictures of past birthdays, vacations, Christmases, and other big family events, my kids almost never see them. Their baby photos? They each have one, sitting in a frame, on a bookshelf. That&rsquo;s their only concept of what they looked like as a baby.</p> <p> This is very different from how I grew up. My mother kept dozens of photo albums on the shelves in the living room. Sometimes when I was bored (and that was often, growing up in the early 80s when we only had three television channels and no Xbox or Wii with which to distract ourselves), I would leaf through the albums, laughing at the pictures of me as a chubby baby; marveling at my beautiful, youthful mom; fascinated that my dad once had hair.</p> <p> Yet, my mom&rsquo;s responsible habit of putting together photo albums had little to do with her superiority as a parent. She simply had to organize these albums, as she didn&rsquo;t want piles of developed photos lying around the house. Photos albums were a necessity&mdash;simply a storage facility for those dozens of 3&times;5 glossies.</p> <p> Today, one doesn&rsquo;t need albums, as you can view photos without going that extra step of actually developing the pictures. And that&rsquo;s precisely one of the problems. Why develop photos when you can endlessly scroll, right? Except that my kids can&rsquo;t scroll. They don&rsquo;t have access to my phone, and even if they did, they would choose Angry Birds over looking at last year&rsquo;s Christmas photos.</p> <p> Of course, I&rsquo;ve tried. I really have tried to download the photos. I&rsquo;ve visited all the websites that claim they&rsquo;ll make it easy for you to organize all your photos. That&rsquo;s largely a lie. Until they figure out a way for me to simply plug in my iPhone and poof! a nice organized book appears three days later, the process is not easy. Ever.</p> <p> Usually, I start out enthusiastically. I&rsquo;ll make a cup of coffee and sit down at the dining room table, ready to organize the photos. I&rsquo;m in a good mood, hopeful and ambitious. Three hours later, I&rsquo;m crying and frustrated. I become overwhelmed, something goes wrong, like the downloading freezes and I have to repeat hours of work, or things just get in the way. It quickly becomes clear: I simply have no way of dedicating hours to a project like organizing tens of thousands of photos. So, I put everything away and move on to other projects, filled with guilt that yet another attempt has failed.</p> <p> Part of the problem, of course, is that technology, while a blessing in many ways, is really a curse when it comes to photo documenting your children&rsquo;s lives. Today, I take dozens of photos a day&mdash;for the most mundane activities. Oh, look! He picked a flower! Gotta capture this tender moment. Oh, look! He&rsquo;s smiling so sweetly as he eats his lunch. That&rsquo;s a keeper! Look! He&rsquo;s licking the sidewalk. Hilarious! Snap, snap, snap. And of course, one photo won&rsquo;t suffice. I take dozens for each event. Scrolling through them later, I realize there&rsquo;s hardly any difference between the photos. Yet, I continue this wasteful photo binging behavior. There must be a support group for this. I&rsquo;ll Google that later.</p> <p> This makes the process of downloading even more of a hassle, as one first needs to go through and organize which ones you actually want. Do I trash the others? Do I move the ones I want to develop to a &ldquo;good photos&rdquo; folder and still keep the rest of them? Do I just give up, admit defeat, become Amish and swear off all technology for the rest of my life? Sometimes that feels like the best path.</p> <p> My mother never dealt with this issue. She didn&rsquo;t take dozens of pictures of exactly the same thing. She took one picture since, forty years ago, camera film was pretty expensive. You didn&rsquo;t waste film trying to take the perfect photo. Instead, you waited for a good enough shot, steadied yourself, clicked once and hoped it came out. And of course, the photos were developed because there was no other way to see the photos. I can still remember the heart pounding anticipation of getting that envelope of developed photos from the drug store, when one-hour photo development was considered an amazing leap in modern technology.</p> <p> Today my kids are surprised if I take fewer than seven photos before breakfast. I&rsquo;m always documenting their lives, though I&rsquo;m still not sure who is ever going to see it.</p> http://iwf.org/news/2801505/Julie GunlockFri, 23 Sep 2016 09:09:00 CSTen-usIndependent Women's ForumPodcast #52 Anti-Bullying Campaigns Should Also Target Parents<p> IWF&#39;s Amber Schwartz interviews IWF senior fellow Julie Gunlock on anti-bullying campaigns at schools. Julie penned an op-ed at National Review Online explaining how these campaigns should target parents and not just children. Both Amber and Julie are mothers of young children.</p> http://iwf.org/media/2801482/Julie GunlockWed, 21 Sep 2016 10:09:00 CSTen-usIndependent Women's ForumAirbnb Regulations + Does Anyone Go To Subway For "Clean" Food? • Cam & Company http://iwf.org/media/2801478/Julie GunlockMon, 19 Sep 2016 08:09:00 CSTen-usIndependent Women's ForumThe Silliest Teen 'Rebels' Ever<p> The Beastie Boys would be so disappointed by today&rsquo;s teenagers. No longer interested in sex, drugs and rock and roll, today&rsquo;s generation of bores is more interested in the composition of their organic salad. When did American teenagers become so staid?</p> <p> According to New York magazine, an increasing number of teenagers have decided to become social-justice warriors about the food they&rsquo;re eating. Why? Because they want to be rebellious.</p> <p> &ldquo;A new study revealed that teenagers are willing to adopt healthy diets as a form of rebellion,&rdquo; says the magazine. &ldquo;Teens aren&rsquo;t as interested in eating healthy just because it&rsquo;s good for them; they&rsquo;re more willing to change their dietary habits to seem cool, according to the research.&rdquo;</p> <p> &nbsp;&ldquo;If the normal way of seeing healthy eating is that it is lame, then you don&rsquo;t want to be the kind of person who is a healthy eater,&rdquo; it says, quoting study co-author David Yeager, of the University of Texas at Austin. &ldquo;But if we make healthy eating seem like the rebellious thing that you do, you make your own choices, you fight back against injustice, then it could be seen as high status.&rdquo;</p> <p> Good grief. It makes me hope I raise a petty thief or a recreational drug user.</p> <p> Of course, this makes sense today. Eating has never been taken so seriously and grocery shopping is now an aspirational pursuit. Moms agonize about every morsel of food that enters their child&rsquo;s body, and bloggers make sport of shaming moms who choose to purchase more affordable (read: not purchased at Whole Foods) groceries.</p> <p> Businesses have even gotten in on the action, designing marketing strategies that play on people&rsquo;s food anxieties. They toss around words like &ldquo;all-natural,&rdquo; &ldquo;clean&rdquo; and &ldquo;healthy&rdquo; and, like Chipotle, promise to only serve the best, organic, non-GMO and most ethical food available (never mind the food-poisoning).</p> <p> Is it any wonder we have a generation of smug teenagers who demand a side of social justice with every meal?</p> <p> American teenagers and young adults are increasingly mollycoddled in every aspect of their lives; of course this has extended to the cafeteria. On-campus speech codes and safe spaces designed to keep students from hearing and seeing things that may challenge their belief system are standard today. Even K-12 students are enjoying a new level of protection.</p> <p> As The Federalist recently reported, there now exists &ldquo;a new proposal to develop government standards for kids&rsquo; feelings, social behavior, and relationships.&rdquo; Is there really a need for this? Isn&rsquo;t school itself supposed to be one gigantic safe space?</p> <p> It&rsquo;s only a matter of time before some eager congressman or senator gets wind of these teenage demands and requires further changes to school-provided lunches &mdash; a federal feeding program so bloated and riddled with waste (not just dollars, food waste is a particular problem), fraud, gross mismanagement and improper payments that exceed $1 billion (yes, that&rsquo;s a B) that the Office of Management and Budget has placed the program on its &ldquo;high-error list.&rdquo;</p> <p> Why not add demands like &ldquo;organic only,&rdquo; &ldquo;non-GMO&rdquo; and &ldquo;wheat grass shots on Wednesdays&rdquo; to the already impossible demand and loads of red tape that comes with staying within federal guidelines while feeding millions of kids each day?</p> <p> Interestingly, the study showed that most kids chose a healthier snack after they were given &ldquo;information on the manipulative nature of the food industry.&rdquo;</p> <p> Yeah, that sounds like solid science right there. Let&rsquo;s imagine how that works:</p> <p> Researcher to 15-year-old kid: &ldquo;So, the company that produces Doritos and cheese sticks &mdash; you know, your favorite foods &mdash; is a part of BIG FOOD, which works to control you and every other American&rsquo;s food choices and tries to keep us all on a diet of processed junk food, which helps BIG AG, so that we can get sick and then demand products from BIG PHARMA. So, how do you feel about Doritos and cheese sticks now?&rdquo;</p> <p> Fifteen-year-old kid to researcher: &ldquo;I&rsquo;ll have the kale, please.&rdquo;</p> <p> It isn&rsquo;t exactly a surprise that if fed a bunch of lies about the food industry, kids are going to choose items that they view as being outside the establishment. Yet, it might be nice to more fully inform these kids about the facts.</p> <p> For instance, these social-justice eaters might be interested to know that the organic industry made around $43 billion last year . . . not exactly a mom-and-pop operation. And that feel-good companies like Annie&rsquo;s Organic is actually owned by General Mills.</p> <p> Of course, there&rsquo;s a tiny sliver of good news in this absurd story. At some point, these kids will move on from their teenage years and ease up a bit on their Portlandia-like food demands. Until then, parents should brace themselves for a return of their picky-eating toddler &mdash; this time, in the form of a kale-smoothie-demanding tween.</p> <p> <a href="http://acculturated.com/"><em>From acculturated.com</em></a></p> http://iwf.org/news/2801451/Julie GunlockSat, 17 Sep 2016 06:09:00 CSTen-usIndependent Women's ForumYou Gotta Fight For Your Right . . . To Microgreens<p> The Beastie Boys would be so disappointed by today&rsquo;s teenagers. No longer interested in sex, drugs and rock and roll, today&rsquo;s generation of bores is more interested in the composition of their organic salad. When did American teenagers become so staid?</p> <p> <a href="http://nymag.com/scienceofus/2016/09/teens-willing-to-eat-healthy-as-a-form-of-rebellion.html">According to</a> New York magazine, an increasing number of teenagers have decided to become social justice warriors about the food their eating. Why? Because they want to be rebellious.</p> <p style="margin-left: 40px;"> <em>A new study revealed that teenagers are willing to adopt healthy diets as a form of rebellion, the Guardian reports. Teens aren&rsquo;t as interested in eating healthy just because it&rsquo;s good for them; they&rsquo;re more willing to change their dietary habits to seem cool, according to the research.</em></p> <p style="margin-left: 40px;"> <em>&ldquo;If the normal way of seeing healthy eating is that it is lame, then you don&rsquo;t want to be the kind of person who is a healthy eater,&rdquo; study co-author David Yeager, of the University of Texas at Austin, told the Guardian. &ldquo;But if we make healthy eating seem like the rebellious thing that you do, you make your own choices, you fight back against injustice, then it could be seen as high status.&rdquo;</em></p> <p> Good grief. It makes me hope I raise a petty thief or a recreational drug user.</p> <p> Of course, this makes sense today. Eating has never been taken so seriously and grocery shopping is now an aspirational pursuit. Moms agonize about every morsel of food that enters their child&rsquo;s body and mommy bloggers make sport of shaming moms who choose to purchase more affordable (read: not purchased at Whole Foods) groceries.</p> <p> Businesses have even gotten in on the action, designing marketing strategies that play on people&rsquo;s food anxieties. They toss around words like &ldquo;all-natural,&rdquo; &ldquo;clean,&rdquo; and &ldquo;healthy&rdquo; and, like Chipotle, promise to only serve the best, organic, non-GMO, and most ethical food available (never mind the food poisoning).</p> <p> Is it any wonder we have a generation of smug teenagers who demand a side of social justice with every meal?</p> <p> American teenagers and young adults are increasingly mollycoddled in every aspect of their lives; of course this has extended to the cafeteria. On-campus speech codes and safe spaces designed to keep students from hearing and seeing things that may challenge their belief system are standard today. Even K-12 students are enjoying a new level of protection. As The Federalist recently <a href="http://thefederalist.com/2016/08/08/tennessee-to-create-safe-spaces-in-k-12-schools/">reported</a>, there now exists &ldquo;a new proposal to develop government standards for kids&rsquo; feelings, social behavior, and relationships.&rdquo; Is there really a need for this? Isn&rsquo;t school itself supposed to be one gigantic safe space?</p> <p> It&rsquo;s only a matter of time before some eager congressman or senator gets wind of these teenage demands and requires further changes to school-provided lunches&mdash;a federal feeding program so bloated and riddled with waste (not just dollars, food waste is a particular problem), fraud, gross mismanagement and improper payments that exceed $1 billion (yes, that&rsquo;s a B) that the Office of Management and Budget has placed the program on its &ldquo;high-error list.&rdquo;</p> <p> Why not add demands like &ldquo;organic only,&rdquo; &ldquo;non-GMO&rdquo; and &ldquo;wheat grass shots on Wednesdays&rdquo; to the already impossible demand and loads of red tape that comes with staying within federal guidelines while feeding millions of kids each day?</p> <p> Interestingly, the study showed that most kids chose a healthier snack after they were given &ldquo;information on the manipulative nature of the food industry.&rdquo; Yeah, that sounds like solid science right there. Let&rsquo;s imagine how that works:</p> <p style="margin-left: 40px;"> <em>Researcher to fifteen-year-old kid: &ldquo;So, the company that produces Doritos and cheese sticks&mdash;you know, your favorite foods, is a part of BIG FOOD, which works to control you and every other American&rsquo;s food choices and tries to keep us all on a diet of processed junk food, which helps BIG AG, so that we can get sick and then demand products from BIG PHARMA. So, how do you feel about Doritos and cheese sticks now?&rdquo;</em></p> <p style="margin-left: 40px;"> <em>Fifteen-year-old kid to researcher: &ldquo;I&rsquo;ll have the kale, please.&rdquo;</em></p> <p> It isn&rsquo;t exactly a surprise that if fed a bunch of lies about the food industry, kids are going to choose items that they view as being outside the establishment. Yet, it might be nice to more fully inform these kids about the facts. For instance, these social justice eaters might be interested to know that the organic industry made <a href="https://www.ota.com/news/press-releases/19031">around $43 billion last year</a> . . . not exactly a mom and pop operation. And that feel-good companies like Annie&rsquo;s Organic is actually owned by General Mills.</p> <p> Of course, there&rsquo;s a tiny sliver of good news in this absurd story. At some point, these kids will move on from their teenage years and ease up a bit on their Portlandia-like food demands. Until then, parents should brace themselves for a return of their picky eating toddler&mdash;this time, in the form of a kale-smoothie-demanding tween.</p> http://iwf.org/news/2801424/Julie GunlockThu, 15 Sep 2016 09:09:00 CSTen-usIndependent Women's ForumObama's Female Staffers Engage in Groupthink. World Applauds!<p> Yesterday, <a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/powerpost/wp/2016/09/13/white-house-women-are-now-in-the-room-where-it-happens/?mc_cid=23f41632c6&amp;mc_eid=4cd64fb794&amp;postshare=6251473762897800&amp;tid=ss_tw&amp;wpisrc=nl_daily202&amp;wpmm=1"><em>The Washington Post</em> ran a story</a> about women in the White House and their struggle to be taken more seriously among the West Wing boys club. According to the story, certain female staffers felt they weren&#39;t being heard or taken very seriously in meetings with the boss so they hatched a scheme to get noticed.</p> <blockquote> <p> Female staffers adopted a meeting strategy they called &ldquo;amplification&rdquo;: When a woman made a key point, other women would repeat it, giving credit to its author. This forced the men in the room to recognize the contribution &mdash; and denied them the chance to claim the idea as their own.&nbsp;</p> <p> &ldquo;We just started doing it, and made a purpose of doing it. It was an everyday thing,&rdquo; said one former Obama aide who requested anonymity to speak frankly.</p> </blockquote> <p> I get it, I get it. Okay ladies, this is what you do: No matter what a female says, nod in agreement like a robot!</p> <p> If a female says &quot;we should bomb the crap out of North Korea&quot; just clap your hands and say &quot;heck yes!&quot; If a woman says &quot;time to start paying those Iranians for American hostages,&quot; raise your hands above your head and scream &quot;can I get a hallelujah?&quot; If someone says &quot;time to bring back prayer in schools,&quot; just grin and give a big thumbs...oh wait.&nbsp;</p> <p> Anyway, you get the point. If you have lady parts, never disagree with the lady sitting next to you.</p> <p> We&#39;re all in this groupthink together.&nbsp;Way to go, ladies.&nbsp;</p> http://iwf.org/blog/2801407/Julie GunlockWed, 14 Sep 2016 09:09:00 CSTen-usIndependent Women's ForumParents Should Also Be Targets In Anti-Bully Initiatives • Garrison http://iwf.org/media/2801352/Julie GunlockThu, 8 Sep 2016 14:09:00 CSTen-usIndependent Women's ForumAnti-Bullying Campaigns Need to Target Parents, Not Just Kids • Cam & Company http://iwf.org/media/2801330/Julie GunlockTue, 6 Sep 2016 15:09:00 CSTen-usIndependent Women's ForumAnti-Bullying Campaigns Need to Target Parents, Not Just Kids <p> Schools are increasingly under pressure to do something (anything!) about bullying. Some schools, such as the one my children attend, require all students to sign an anti-bullying pledge on their first day of school. Others hold lectures and assign books aimed at educating kids about bullying. But rarely are the parents of bullies ever the target of this outreach, which is one reason bullying continues to be a problem.</p> <p> The media often focus on the results of bullying, reporting on cases like 13-year-old Daniel Fitzpatrick, who killed himself last month after allegedly being bullied by classmates. Or 13-year-old Emilie Olsen, who took her own life in 2014 after years of torment and despite her father&rsquo;s constant pleas to school administrators to put a stop to the bullying. Emilie&rsquo;s parents are now suing the school district as well as some of the students who bullied their daughter.</p> <p> Most parents have experience with bullying. I do. Sadly, my son was bullied when he was only in first grade. My son&rsquo;s experience probably wasn&rsquo;t all that unique, although even his teacher admitted that his bully showed an oddly sophisticated talent for cruelty for such a young child. (It turns out this boy had significant problems at home and, not surprisingly, he continues to have behavioral problems.)</p> <p> When my son finally told me what was happening, I immediately approached his teacher. Expecting sympathy and swift action, she instead impassively said she&rsquo;d have the school counselor come in to talk to the whole class about bullying. &ldquo;The whole class?&rdquo; I objected. &ldquo;But this is a particular boy &mdash; why dilute the messages when we know the identity of the child involved?&rdquo; She said that bullying is better handled in this manner.</p> <p> I then went to the school principal, who coolly explained that privacy rules prevented him from letting me know if the parents of the bully had been told. Predictably, these milquetoast gestures did nothing to alleviate the situation and my son had a tough year.</p> <p> Some positive things did come out of our experience. It gave me an opportunity to have lots of conversations about what it means to be a good person. Now three years later, we work hard to avoid the bully, and my son has developed into a very sensitive young man who is quickly aware of how other people are treated, and he will always stick up for those left out or sidelined. He also naturally gravitates toward other kind kids &mdash; the underdogs, the smart kids, the sweet and more sensitive kids, and the ones who are close to their parents.</p> <p> This experience also made me rather cynical when it comes to school-based anti-bullying efforts. While well meaning, they are simply a labor-intensive show to demonstrate something&rsquo;s being done when there&rsquo;s really nothing much at all being done to actually discourage bad behavior.</p> <p> If the schools really wanted results, they&rsquo;d spend less time talking to the kids and more time talking to the parents of kids known to bully. In our case, the bully&rsquo;s parents weren&rsquo;t particularly nice people either and clearly weren&rsquo;t teaching the Golden Rule at home. It&rsquo;s no surprise that that child&rsquo;s behavior reflected what he saw in his own home.</p> <p> To create an effective anti-bullying program, schools need to make parents aware immediately of their kids&rsquo; behavior and to make them understand that serious consequences will follow if the problems continue. Tougher school policies should also be put in place that will impact parents &mdash; things like a zero-tolerance policy that involves suspensions and possible expulsion. After all, nothing will motivate&nbsp;parents more than the idea that they&rsquo;ll have to miss a week of work because their kid misbehaves in school.</p> <p> Schools can and should do more to prevent ongoing bullying at school. But ultimately, parents &mdash; not the school &mdash; need to take the lead in teaching kindness, compassion, and manners. More of the same anti-bullying campaigns may please administrators, but they aren&rsquo;t helping those who are still confronting bullies in school each day.</p> <p> &mdash; Julie Gunlock is a senior fellow at the Independent Women&rsquo;s Forum.</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> http://iwf.org/news/2801322/Julie GunlockSat, 3 Sep 2016 08:09:00 CSTen-usIndependent Women's ForumAlarmists Are Fun Stealers + Cam & Julie's New #Bespoke Podcast • Cam & Company http://iwf.org/media/2801276/Julie GunlockTue, 30 Aug 2016 09:08:00 CSTen-usIndependent Women's ForumTeam Jen! Leave Jennifer Aniston (and her face wash!) Alone. <p> Yesterday, the<em> <a href="http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3762854/Jen-blush-shame-facial-scrub-adverts-Actress-criticised-endorsing-product-laced-microbeads.html">Daily Mail </a></em><a href="http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3762854/Jen-blush-shame-facial-scrub-adverts-Actress-criticised-endorsing-product-laced-microbeads.html">reported</a> that the scientific journal<em> </em><a href="http://www.nature.com/news/in-the-name-of-beauty-1.18398"><em>Nature</em> is criticizing actress Jennifer Aniston</a> for promoting Aveeno face wash, which contains microbeads (microbeads are tiny plastic beads that act as exfoliators). This story is sure to resurrect the war on microbeads (the <em>Nature</em> editorial was actually written last year, but the Daily Mail is only reporting on it now)</p> <p> For years, activists have been after microbeads, claiming they are ending up in waterways and killing off marine life. Yet, as I<a href="http://www.iwf.org/blog/2800026/Are-Microbeads-Really-Bad-"> wrote a few months ago</a>, that isn&#39;t even remotely true. According to Allen Burton, a professor of Natural Resources and Environment at the University of Michigan, <a href="http://www.detroitnews.com/story/opinion/2016/04/24/microbeads-cosmetics-ban-environment/83476570/">a new study</a>&nbsp;is casting doubt on the whole microbeads=disaster narrative (emphasis mine):</p> <blockquote> <p> At the University of Michigan, scientists have cut apart and examined 145 fish from Lakes Huron and Erie, where some of the highest levels of microplastics in the world have been reported. These represented the six species most likely to consume microplastics. Under the microscope, we examined the gut of each. <strong>Not one contained a microbead of plastic. Not one.</strong></p> </blockquote> <p> <em>Nature</em> doesn&#39;t mention this study. Instead the editors mention another study that supports their anti-microbead agenda. Yet, if you actually read the study cited by <em>Nature&#39;s</em> editors, you&rsquo;d see that the researchers never actually measured the amount of microbeads in waterways; instead they relied on data from waste water treatment plants. And guess what? That data also showed that microbeads aren&#39;t a huge problem. Take a look at this passage in the study (brackets mine):</p> <blockquote> <p> Water collected by WWTPs [waste water treatment plants] goes through several treatment processes. As part of these processes, wastewater is sent to settling tanks to separate suspended solids (sludge) from the liquid phase (effluent) [effluent is the water the plant dumps back into the waterways]. Here, 95&ndash;99.9% of the microbeads may settle out into the sludge, leaving the remaining beads in the effluent.(1, 2)&nbsp;Studies report a range of 0&ndash;7 microbeads L&ndash;1&nbsp;of final effluent,(1-3)&nbsp;which is often discharged directly to aquatic habitats.</p> </blockquote> <p> Okay, so what the researchers are saying is that nearly all (95-99.9%) of the microbeads were captured and destroyed by the waste water treatment plant (it ends up in the sludge). What&#39;s left is 0-7 microbeads per liter of water. So, some liters might have zero microbeads, some might have two, five, six. No more than seven microbeads were found in a liter of water. It&#39;s also important to realize that the liter of water cited in the study is part of the effluent--the water that&#39;s returned to the larger body of water by the waste water treatment plant. So those seven microbeads are diluted further.</p> <p> Not surprisingly, <em>Nature</em> managed to turn this into bad news. That&#39;s some impressive journalistic gymnastics at work there. Yet, <em>Nature</em> seems to admit that this research is flawed. In this paragraph, they mention that no one really knows what they&#39;re talking about when it comes to microbeads and dead fish.</p> <blockquote> <p> The consequences of this ubiquitous plastic for marine species, marine ecosystems and human health remain areas of active research. But the public and policymakers need not wait for detailed results before taking action.&nbsp;</p> </blockquote> <p> That&#39;s right. Why wait to know the facts before banning something, right? Perhaps what the editors are really worried about is that science will prove microbeads aren&#39;t so bad after all. That&#39;s already happening (see Professor Burton&#39;s study above). &nbsp;</p> <p> <em>Nature</em> needs to stick to good science and drop the environmental agenda. And they owe Jennifer Aniston an apology for their bullying editorial. &nbsp;</p> http://iwf.org/blog/2801266/Julie GunlockMon, 29 Aug 2016 15:08:00 CSTen-usIndependent Women's Forum#1 What It Means To Be A Bespoke Parenthttp://iwf.org/media/2801236/Julie GunlockThu, 25 Aug 2016 16:08:00 CSTen-usIndependent Women's ForumDaycare Provider Reported Parents to CPS Because of a Birth Mark • WIBC Garrisonhttp://iwf.org/media/2801201/Julie GunlockFri, 19 Aug 2016 13:08:00 CSTen-usIndependent Women's ForumChild Protective Services & Handprint Mom • Cam & Company http://iwf.org/media/2801148/Julie GunlockTue, 16 Aug 2016 15:08:00 CSTen-usIndependent Women's ForumPodcast #47 BOOK: Government Ruins Nearly Everything<p> IWF&#39;s Julie Gunlock interviews Laura Carno, the founder of I Am Created Equal, a non-profit focused on individual rights. Julie and Laura discuss Laura&#39;s new book Government Ruins Nearly Everything.</p> http://iwf.org/media/2801103/Julie GunlockWed, 10 Aug 2016 13:08:00 CSTen-usIndependent Women's Forum